#WADOD – Day 15: March 15th 2019

Works and Days of Division – 29 poems by Martyn Crucefix

Drawing on two disparate sources, this sequence of mongrel-bred poems has been written to respond to the historical moment in this most disunited kingdom. Hesiod’s Works and Days – probably the oldest poem in the Western canon – is a poem driven by a dispute between brothers. The so-called vacana poems originate in the bhakti religious protest movements in 10-12th century India. Through plain language, repetition and refrain, they offer praise to the god, Siva, though they also express personal anger, puzzlement, even despair. Dear reader – if you like what you find here, please share the poems as widely as you can (no copyright restrictions). Or follow this blog for future postings. Bridges need building.

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Friday 15.03.2019

‘an americano to go’

an abecedary – to Brexit Secretary, Steve Barclay, who yesterday could find no kinship between speaking and voting

an americano to go

black of a white man’s heart

crude statistics

when were they kin

 

daubed with shitty feathers

eggs cracked in a bowl

footnotes about emails

when were they kin

 

growing weed under LEDs

headlines and tenderness

in the moment of conception

when were they kin

 

john smith marries jane doe

klaxons sounding

languages east west north south

when were they kin

 

my emigre daughter

notes from strings of a mandolin

olives in a screw-top jar

when were they kin

 

pulsing blue in the Uber driver’s ear

queries on the first page

red sky in the morning

when were they kin

 

share like like share

tangled nests of fishing line

up and over the brim

when were they kin

 

very near the end

when the bridges are burning

xanthoma tendinosum

you wake and you’re done

 

when will you understand

zest and intelligence

when were they kin

when were they kin

 

This poem first appeared on New Boots and Pantisocracies (February 2019)

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