#WADOD – Day 13: March 13th 2019

Works and Days of Division – 29 poems by Martyn Crucefix

Drawing on two disparate sources, this sequence of mongrel-bred poems has been written to respond to the historical moment in this most disunited kingdom. Hesiod’s Works and Days – probably the oldest poem in the Western canon – is a poem driven by a dispute between brothers. The so-called vacana poems originate in the bhakti religious protest movements in 10-12th century India. Through plain language, repetition and refrain, they offer praise to the god, Siva, though they also express personal anger, puzzlement, even despair. Dear reader – if you like what you find here, please share the poems as widely as you can (no copyright restrictions). Or follow this blog for future postings. Bridges need building.

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Wednesday 13.03.2019

‘to tell the truth it’s hardly more’

 

to tell the truth it’s hardly more

than a convenient extension to the back lot

 

of the forecourt of our local BP garage

on the northernmost side of this satellite town

 

yet we all agree this is an excellent shop

which means we’ll be back tomorrow

 

and the next day most likely and in this way

family traditions take root

 

as today we buy tampons and baked beans

a salad bag and a brace of frozen garlic bread

 

at the very last moment we choose

to snatch up a print newspaper from its rack

 

with its bold and reassuring headline

bridges fit for purpose says govt. minister

 

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4 thoughts on “#WADOD – Day 13: March 13th 2019

  1. I like this one

    On Wed, Mar 13, 2019 at 10:10 AM Martyn Crucefix wrote:

    > martyn crucefix posted: “Works and Days of Division – 29 poems by Martyn > Crucefix Drawing on two disparate sources, this sequence of mongrel-bred > poems has been written to respond to the historical moment in this most > disunited kingdom. Hesiod’s Works and Days – probably the old” >

    Like

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